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Repeated Grade

How To Help Children And Youth That Have Repeated A Grade At School

This is a very complicated and controversial issue. Repeating a grade can be devastating to self-confidence and success in later life. The majority of children & youth who repeat a grade do not finish high school. Repeating a grade should most often be avoided at all costs. A child or youth who has repeated a grade should be promoted as soon as possible to catch up with her/his age group to undo the negative effects of grade repetition on self-confidence. Special help has to be given so the child or youth experiences a great deal of academic success. Getting a thorough medical checkup is highly recommended the minute grade repeating is considered. Undetected medical conditions can cause poor school performance.

There are many types of intelligence and styles of learning. With support, intelligence can be improved. With support, learning styles can be enhanced. When educators and parents blame children or youth for being lazy, they are avoiding responsibility for finding what will help them be successful. Having young children begin school when they are older is a good formula for success. The oldest children in a class often are the most successful and learn the easiest throughout their lives.

Occasionally, children & youth are relieved when they are required to repeat a grade because the pressure to be successful has been so uncomfortable. This can be a short term gain, since they will carry the stigma into the rest of their lives. Better to repeat the grade, get lots of extra help to catch up and rejoin the social group. Sometimes, however, when the children or youth are the youngest in a class, repeating a grade actually connects them with their social group, carries less stigma, and turns out to be beneficial for them.

Most often making a child or youth repeat a grade indicates a failure of the school, not the child or youth. Usually falling behind the other children or youth and being forced to repeat a grade is due to the child being amongst the youngest in the class and thus being immature intellectually and socially. These factors can cause stress and slow learning.

Insufficient progress in academic programs is also often due to and complicated by: learning disabilities; perceptual challenges; learning styles not compatible with teaching style; difficulties following instructions; challenges remembering; genetics; family patterns; lack of sleep; lack of regular nutritious meals; family turmoil and change including illness, separation, divorce, incarceration; parental addictions; poverty; prolonged stress; challenges with physical organization/coordination; challenges with concentration and focusing; unsafe schools; moving schools and homes often. All of these can be complicated by frequent illnesses; high stress; peer pressure at school, gang involvement; child, youth and parental substance abuse challenges; child or youth or parent depressions/anxiety; physical, emotional and neurological imbalance due to traumas and abuses of all kinds. Exposure to environmental pollutants may also be involved.

First, We Would Investigate

Second, We Would Investigate

For Long Term Support
We Would Investigate

  • Western Medicine
  • Osteopathy
  • Precision Teaching
  • Light Therapy
  • Developmental Optometry
  • Nutrition Consulting
  • Craniosacral
  • EMDR
  • Hypnotherapy
  • Attitudinal Healing
  • Psychiatry
  • Chiropractic
  • Traditional Chinese Medicine
  • Ayurveda
  • Herbology
  • Homeopathy
  • Nonviolent Communication
  • Independent Study
  • Expressive Arts
  • Music Lessons
  • Drumming
  • Safe School Ambassadors
  • Support For Parents
  • Environmentally Healthy Homes
  • Aromatherapy
  • Flower Essences
  • Wilderness Therapy
  • Psychotherapy
  • Aikido
  • Wilderness Therapy
  • Massage
  • Nutrition Consulting
  • Ayurveda
  • Traditional Chinese Medicine
  • Herbology
  • Homeopathy
  • Flower Essences
  • Aromatherapy
  • Aikido
  • Expressive Arts
  • Attitudinal Healing
  • Nonviolent Communication
  • Independent Study
  • Support For Parents

On Our Own We Would Try: • Less or No TV, Movies, Video/Computer Games • Bedtime Stories and Chats • Replace sodas, juices, sugars, fats, fast foods with water, veggies, whole grains, nuts, protein, fruit, slow food • Long Walks/Hikes • Nature • Wholesome Pleasures • Back Rubs and Foot Massages • Pets

For Parents: • Get the school district psychologist to test for learning difficulties. • If you can, also get a private psychologist to do the same for a second opinion. • Get the school district to support your child or youth more effectively. • Keep advocating for your child or youth. • Avoid blaming the child or youth. • Acknowledge skills, gifts, talents of everyone in the family often. • Rebild confidence by singing, dancing, cooking and making things together as a family. • Learn new things as a family–like dancing or singing or a new language. • Help your child or youth fall in love with learning. • Restricting TV gives the child or youth more time for activity. • Find parents of children or youth with the same challenge and support each other.

• Avoid homework wars. • Learn study skills yourself and teach them to your child or youth. • Develop study and homework routines by setting aside regular, predictable times for learning. Do homework in as quiet and safe a place as possible. • Make homework a game/chore and pleasantly accompany the child or youth while doing it. • Find someone who is cheerful and who the child or youth likes to act as a learning coach. Have that person teach learning strategies as well as assist with the task of catching up.

• Keep your worry to yourself.

Check out: www.MedlinePlus.org; www.kidshealth.org.

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